A Change in Leadership

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With the end of the 2014-15 academic year comes the end of an era. In May, long-time library director, Anne Dalesandro, announced that she:

will be stepping down from the library directorship on June 30th and will begin a six-month research leave. My official retirement date will be at the end of this year. But I will still be around figuring out what emeritus librarians do and continuing to work on several library projects on a volunteer basis.

Anne’s history with the law school began long before her appointment as the director. Anne began as a law student at Rutgers School of Law-Camden, graduating in 1975. She followed this degree with one in library sciences from Rutgers School of Library and Information Sciences, in the meantime joining the law library staff in 1976. Anne worked in the library as a legal research specialist and head of public services until 1992, when she was appointed the interim library director, and officially became the library director in 1993. Anne proudly served the needs of the law school through her unwavering service as the library director for more than two decades.

Dedicated to faculty services, Anne conscientiously accommodated faculty suggestions and requests to strengthen the library’s collection and library services to law faculty, respectively. Likewise, Anne was constantly thinking about the students and found countless ways of soliciting feedback in order to make the library a more welcoming and supportive place for each successive generation of students.

 

John Joergensen

Stepping into the role of the new director for the, now, merged Rutgers University Law School Library, is John Joergensen. Beginning in 1996, John was a reference librarian and the head of circulation here in Camden before becoming director of the Newark Law Library in 2012. Here’s a little bit about John, from his faculty profile page:

During his tenure at Rutgers–Camden, Professor Joergensen organized the New Jersey Courtweb Project, which provides free Internet access to the full text of the decisions of the New Jersey Supreme Court and appellate courts, Tax Court, administrative law decisions, U.S. District Court of the District of New Jersey decisions, and the New Jersey Supreme Court’s Ethics Committee opinions. His work also included digitizing U.S. congressional documents, the deliberations of state Constitutional Conventions, and other historical records. In 2007 he received the Public Access to Government Information Award from the American Association of Law Libraries and in 2011 was named to the Fastcase 50 as one of the country’s “most interesting and provocative leaders in the combined fields of law, scholarship and technology.”

John will be managing the resources and staff of both the Newark and Camden library locations.

Welcome back, John!

Law360

Rutgers School of Law-Camden students and faculty can now enjoy unlimited access to Law360! In the past, Law360 resources had been accessible through Lexis.com or Lexis Advance; all of those resources are now available through the stand-alone site, along with all of the other fantastic Law360.com features.

Law360 offers legal news and analysis across 43 practice areas, covering:

  • Every major litigation development in the U.S. federal district courts
  • Every major lawsuit filed against the world’s 2,000 top companies
  • Every major opinion handed down in the U.S. federal courts
  • Every major initiative by state, federal and international legislatures
  • and more!

(http://www.law360.com/about)

The law school community can take advantage of the special features only offered on the stand-alone Law360 site, which include:

  • In-depth features about trends in every practice area
  • Interviews with policy makers, corporate counsel and top lawyers
  • Expert Analysis by leading practitioners
  • Surveys of major litigation trends
  • and more!

(http://www.law360.com/about)

Sign up for daily newsletters today to keep abreast of legal news, analysis, commentary, and more in any practice area and/or jurisdiction.

Also, check out the Law360 “Beta Tools” by click on the appropriate links at the bottom of each page. The Beta Tools allow users to track dockets, track attorneys, and track judges!

Getting the Most from your Google Search

Law Librarian:

Good tips!

Originally posted on RIPS Law Librarian Blog:

The 2012 Ross-Blakley Law Library student survey revealed that 57% of the student body at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law begins their research by conducting a Google search. Truthfully, I also frequently use Google to conduct my own research. It can be both an efficient and accurate search tool if you know how to utilize its features. Below are a few tips to help you get the best results out of your Google searches.

Advanced Search

The Google Advanced Search template allows you to use syntax tools to craft a better question with Boolean operators and provides filters (such as date and language) to narrow the search results. It also gives you the ability to limit your search to a single type of document, such as a PDF file or PowerPoint presentation, by utilizing the “file type” drop-down menu.

Search Specific Types of Websites

You can limit your Google search to…

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Legal News & Analysis: How to Stay Current

In a previous post, we  told you about how to stay current with New Jersey Legal (& Local) News. Whether using print or electronic versions of legal newspapers and periodicals, staying current with current events may give you an edge in practice.

Legal newspapers or periodicals will inform you of relevant court decisions, the emergence of new laws, changes to existing laws, and may also include substantive legal articles written by experts in their fields (and sometimes, gossip).

Another way to stay current is to have some of that information emailed directly to your inbox. Justia can supplement your daily intake of legal news and analysis. Justia users can subscribe to receive daily newsletters of opinion summaries for the Supreme Court, Circuit Courts of Appeal, and all state supreme courts. That means that it can be as easy as a free and simple registration to stay on top of 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals and NJ State Supreme Court opinions (and more). Once you register, you can elect to receive daily opinion summaries by jurisdiction and/or practice area. Each summary is followed by a link to view the case; users will be taken to the case page to find the opinion summary followed by the full-text opinion (HTML or PDF).

Justia also offers a daily newsletter of their Legal Analysis and Commentary column: Verdict.

Verdict columns cover a broad range of legal subjects, including constitutional law, international human rights, new technologies, discrimination, family law, law and economics, defamation, consumer issues, child sexual abuse and animal rights.

These commentaries are written by today’s legal experts.

Subscribe today!

 

Written by CDS.

The Search Engine That Doesn’t Track You Just Got Better – DuckDuckGo.

Originally posted on The Researching Paralegal:

DuckDuckGo, The Search Engine That Doesn’t Track You, Makes Terrific Overhaul Official, by Zach Miners, PC World

http://tinyurl.com/os4eyxr

DuckDuckGo, the privacy-themed search engine, has received a major redesign with enhanced search tools that could usher in a wave of new users.

The tools, announced Tuesday, include a variety of requested changes, including auto-suggest and local search, that make the site function more like Google, but with DuckDuckGo’s privacy promises still in place. 

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DuckDuckGo’s search engine is one of a number of online services that have gained increased attention following disclosures around government surveillance leaked last year by former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden. According to its privacy policy, DuckDuckGo keeps no record of users’ searches, prevents them from being leaked to other sites, and does not log IP addresses. The site still has ads, but they’re not targeted using personal…

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U.S. Federal Agency Documents, Decisions, and Appeals

A new library collection is available through the Law Library’s HeinOnline database: U.S. Federal Agency Documents, Decisions, and Appeals. This library features:

… the reports, decisions, and records, this library is a complete collection of the official case law of some of the United States most important U.S. Federal Agencies such as: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). It also includes more than 65 GPO best selling legal titles (from HeinOnline).

Users can browse this collection by Agency, Agency document, or GPO best sellers.

To access this collection: from the Law Library Homepage > Research Resources > Research Databases > HeinOnline, and the US Federal Documents, Decisions, and Appeals library will be available from the HeinOnline homepage.

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Written by CDS.

The Library of Congress’ Virtual Reference Shelf.

Originally posted on The Researching Paralegal:

Virtual Reference Shelf, Library of Congress

http://www.loc.gov/rr/askalib/virtualref.html#abbreviations

Do you for some kind of inexplicable reason want to look up The Guide to Government Abbreviations? It’s here. In fact, the Virtual Reference Shelf has in-depth information on Abbreviations, Art, Business, Calculators, Children & Parents (e.g., The U.S. Government Guide for Kids), Dictionaries & Thesauri, Directories, Education, Encyclopedias, English Language and Literature, Full-Text Books & Periodicals, Genealogy, General Reference Resources, Grant Resources, Health/Medical, U.S. History – and more. Check it out. It is more than you probably expect. -CCE

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