The Library of Congress’ Virtual Reference Shelf.

Originally posted on The Researching Paralegal:

Virtual Reference Shelf, Library of Congress

http://www.loc.gov/rr/askalib/virtualref.html#abbreviations

Do you for some kind of inexplicable reason want to look up The Guide to Government Abbreviations? It’s here. In fact, the Virtual Reference Shelf has in-depth information on Abbreviations, Art, Business, Calculators, Children & Parents (e.g., The U.S. Government Guide for Kids), Dictionaries & Thesauri, Directories, Education, Encyclopedias, English Language and Literature, Full-Text Books & Periodicals, Genealogy, General Reference Resources, Grant Resources, Health/Medical, U.S. History – and more. Check it out. It is more than you probably expect. -CCE

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New Jersey Legal (& Local) News

Law Librarian:

This just in: Bob Ambrogi reports that ALM, publisher of the New Jersey Law Journal, is up for sale. Read more about this on LawSites Blog: http://www.lawsitesblog.com/2014/04/precarious-time-legal-newspapers.html

Originally posted on Quo Vadis?:

(Disclaimer: the content of this post is not meant as an endorsement for any commercial product mentioned.)

As a legal professional, it’s a good idea to stay up-to-date with current events within your local community and area of practice.  Legal newspapers or periodicals will inform you of relevant court decisions, the emergence of new laws, changes to existing laws, and may also include substantive legal articles written by experts in their fields (and sometimes, gossip).  Our local source for this information is the New Jersey Law Journal (NJLJ).  You can review a print copy of this publication from the Circulation desk.  (Note: this item is on reserve, so you will be asked to leave a form of ID.)

Rutgers Law Students and Faculty can also review the NJLJ (and similar legal newspapers from other cities and regions) online using Lexis Nexis (*UPDATED: see below).  From the main page, select the…

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News From Lexis!

This just in, from LexisNexis ® :

I’m excited to let you know that we’re again offering students unlimited access to Lexis Advance this summer! Here’s an update on the LexisNexis® 2014 Summer Access program, Think Like a Lawyer program, and related teaching tools as you prepare your students for their summer and post graduate positions. We appreciate any assistance you can provide in ensuring your students know about the summer access program and all training opportunities prior to starting their summer jobs.

Summer 2014: All-Access to Lexis Advance®

1Ls & 2Ls: Students may continue to use their current Lexis Advance® ID for any purpose this summer– including work they perform at a law firm, corporation or government agency.

Lexis Advance ID all summer long for:

Any purpose at all
All legal content and news on their current law student ID
Unlimited hours-per-week
Graduating 3Ls, can register for one of our Graduate Program IDs that will extend their access beyond graduation. To learn more, visit www.lexisnexis.com/grad-access.

Think Like a Lawyer

Please share this Think Like A Lawyer link with your students so they can take advantage of training opportunities prior to heading out this summer. As you know, many employers require or highly recommend their incoming associates attend all applicable training offered at their school. Think Like a Lawyer training opportunities include Professional Research Certification designed to include the research skills expected among incoming associates based on feedback from commercial customers. The site also provides links to the summer access and 3L Graduate ID programs.

If you have any questions about your LexisNexis ®  subscription, please do not hesitate to contact (in no particular order):

  • Reference Librarians (lawlib [at] camden [dot] rutgers [dot] edu);
  • Lexis Representative Melissa Gorsline (melissa [dot] gorsline [at] lexisnexis [dot] com); or
  • Lexis Student Representatives, usually seated by the circulation desk of the library.

Posted by CDS.

New Jersey Institute for Continuing Legal Education (NJICLE) Materials

Continuing Legal Education (CLE) courses are intended to maintain the professional development of practicing attorneys. Often, CLE courses yield publications or handouts, which are great resources for research into current practices in certain practice areas.

Where can you find NJICLE materials:

  • In the Law Library. In the Law Library catalog, run an Author search for “New Jersey Institute for Continuing Legal Education” (no quotes). You can search within these results to find subject-specific materials by using the “Limit/Sort Search” button above the search bar.
  • On BloombergLaw. From the home page, select the Legal Analysis & News tab, and then select Books & Treatises. One of the selections will be for the New Jersey Institute for Continuing Legal Education (NJICLE). Select a resource to browse the Table to Contents.
  • On Lexis Advance. From the home page, select Browse Sources. In the search bar on the left, search for “NJICLE” (no quotes). By clicking on a resource, you can add that resource to a search, or you can click the link to view the Table of Contents.

For more information about NJICLE, visit their website.

Written by CDS

(HT GBT)

11 Mobile Apps for [not just] Law School Students

Law Librarian:

Always good to have access to information in your back pocket!

Originally posted on CRIV Blog:

http://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/articles/2014/03/19/11-apps-for-law-school-students

Some of these mobile apps are great for lawyers and librarians too. HeinOnline, Lexis Advance, WestLawNext, NOLO’s Plain English Law Dictionary, Camera to PDF, JotNot, ABA Journal,SCOTUSblog

Law lIbrarians were the sources for this list. Nice shoutout to our expertise!

“If in doubt, librarians say to go to the law library or check your library’s website to find the best apps and verify which have the most reliable information.

“‘In the law, of course, it’s very important that you get the law from the right sources,’ says Wisconsin’s Turner.”

 

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LexisAdvance Offers Resources for Teaching Transactional Law

Originally posted on Instructional Technology at Albany Law School:

Lexis Practice Advisor® provides faculty and students with a one-stop online practical guidance tool for transactional legal matters including access to original practical guidance, thousands of model forms and many other transactional resources, all hand-selected and written by attorneys currently practicing at leading law firms.

Practice areas covered:

  • Banking & Finance
  • Business & Commercial
  • California Business & Commercial
  • Corporate Counsel
  • Financial Restructuring & Bankruptcy
  • Intellectual Property & Technology
  • Mergers & Acquisitions
  • Real Estate
  • Securities & Capital Modules

Resources:

  • Model forms that are drafted and vetted by leading attorneys currently practicing in the area of law
  • Drafting notes and Checklists
  • Alternative clauses
  • Practical guidance on carrying out a transactional matter from start to finish
  • Current awareness of emerging issues and developments
  • Relevant legal analysis, cases and codes already compiled on transactional topics
  • Secondary materials including Matthew Bender® treatises

To access Lexis Practice Advisor:

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FOIA Letter Generator

FOIA stands for Freedom of Information Act. But what is it, exactly?

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) provides that any person has a right, enforceable in court, to obtain access to federal agency records, except to the extent that such records (or portions of them) are protected from public disclosure by one of nine exemptions or by one of three special law enforcement record exclusions. A FOIA request can be made for any agency record. – From What is FOIA?

You can learn more about the FOIA from foia.gov, a website containing everything you may need to know about the FOIA, including data and statistics plus FAQs, answered by the US Department of Justice.

How can you go about making a FOIA request? One tool is the FOIA Letter Generator which is produced by the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, a legal advocacy group for journalists. This tool:

… offers templates for putting together FOIA requests and follow-up paperwork for both the federal and state governments.

As one of my colleagues put it:

What I find especially interesting: if you scroll down to “State letter” and choose New Jersey, you’ll see a short outline of hyperlinks before the various fields to be filled in.  These actually link to annotations (case cites, court rules, and the NJSA) that pertain to the request process.

It may not always be as easy as described. That’s why The Center for Investigative Reporting is planning a FOIA Machine Project that is supposed to be a FOIA Letter Generator Plus, in that it will guide users through a “do-it-yourself” freedom of information request. Learn how to support this project at its kickstarter page.

Written by CDS and GBT.